Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://anrows.intersearch.com.au/anrowsjspui/handle/1/19877
Record ID: 210ce85a-218f-4810-a1d2-307abdf7408f
Electronic Resources: https://www.anrows.org.au/project/service-system-responses-and-culturally-designed-practice-frameworks-to-address-the-needs-of-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-children-exposed-to-domestic-and-family-violence/
Web resource: https://www.anrows.org.au/publication/new-ways-for-our-families-designing-an-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-cultural-practice-framework-and-system-responses-to-address-the-impacts-of-dfv-on-children-and-yo/
Type: Report
Title: New Ways for Our Families: Designing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural practice framework and system responses to address the impacts of domestic and family violence on children and young people
Authors: Mitchell, Beverley
Clancy, Kristy
Gray, Tracy
Jia, Thomas
Hostalek, Mary
Gibson, Jamie
Lea, Traven
Trew, Sebastian
Cahill, Alex
Higgins, Daryl
Barber, Ursula
Morgan, Garth
Butler, Candice
French, Reno
Creamer, Tamara
Hillan, Lisa
Ruggiero, Eva
Parsons, Jennifer
Prior, Gareth
Idagi, Lela
Bruce, Rachel
Keywords: Society & Social Sciences
ANRA Topic: Children and young people
Health, primary care and specialist service responses
ANRA Population: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities
Children and young people population
Categories: Understanding victimisation and perpetration, and their impacts
ANROWS Publications
Year: 2022
Publisher: ANROWS
Citation: Issue 06/2022
Abstract:  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are overrepresented in child protection systems in Australia, including in Queensland. These same children and young people also experience high rates of domestic and family violence (DFV), which is often a leading cause for their family’s engagement with child protection services.

Little has been done to understand what works to support First Nations children and young people to heal from their experiences of violence. This research project explores how services and systems can better respond to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people exposed to DFV who come to the attention of child protection systems.

Led by the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak (QATSICPP), a team of First Nations researchers, supported by non-Indigenous researchers, utilised a participatory action research methodology – ensuring cultural safety and adherence to cultural values and protocols, including co-creation of knowledge.

This report, the first in a series for this project, presents the results of a literature review and the findings from the initial cycles of action research conducted with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander chief investigators, community researchers and practitioners working in eight community-controlled child and family services across Queensland.

The literature review and the outcomes of the initial action research cycle confirmed that the experience of DFV in childhood is resulting in negative lifelong outcomes for First Nations children, including increased interactions with the child protection and justice systems. The researchers also found that these responses (child protection and justice) are not adequate or culturally safe. To support healing for these children and young people, the report recommends:

holistic healing opportunities
culturally strong and community-led whole-of-family support
therapeutic healing circles and camps
connection to and knowledge about traditional cultural values, systems and traditions
a framework of perpetrator accountability
system changes include procuring place-based and healing responses for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled services that support self-determination, and working collectively with the whole family.
Additionally, cultural capability across the service system needs to be enhanced, and structural racism needs to be eliminated in order to reduce the load on existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services.

Future publications from this research project, due in 2022, will consist of a research report on the remaining action research cycles and a framework for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people who have experienced DFV and have also come in contact with the child protection system.
Notes: 

This report addresses work covered in the ANROWS research project RP.20.04 "Service system responses and culturally designed practice frameworks to address the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children exposed to domestic and family violence". Please consult the ANROWS website for more information on this project.

ANROWS research contributes to the six National Outcomes of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010–2022. This research addresses National Plan Outcome 3 – Indigenous communities are strengthened

Suggested citation:

Morgan, G., Butler, C., French, R., Creamer, T., Hillan, L., Ruggiero, E., Parsons, J., Prior, G., Idagi, L., Bruce, R., Gray, T., Jia, T., Hostalek, M., Gibson, J., Mitchell, B., Lea, T., Clancy, K., Barber, U., Higgins, D., ... Trew, S. (2022). New Ways for Our Families: Designing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural practice framework and system responses to address the impacts of domestic and family violence on children and young people (Research report, 06/2022). ANROWS.

URI: https://anrows.intersearch.com.au/anrowsjspui/handle/1/19877
ISBN: 9781922645296
9781922645289
Physical description: 1 online resource.
Appears in Collections:ANROWS Publications

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